Cheyenne Garden Gossip

Gardening on the high plains of southeastern Wyoming


Garden gift & New Year’s resolution ideas

Published Dec. 8, 2019, in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle, “Gift and New Year’s resolution ideas for Cheyenne gardeners.”

By Barb Gorges

Here at the end of the year you may be looking for gardening gift ideas for you or someone else. And are you preparing to make New Year’s resolutions to learn more about gardening? Here are some ideas.

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Wardian case – type of terrarium (Wikipedia)

Gardener gifts

From Garden Design magazine:

How about terrariums? You can make them out of large glass jars or fill antique-looking leaded pane structures with small tropical houseplants. Read up on them at https://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Terrarium.

Who knew Crocs come in many rubber-boot styles? But we shouldn’t be out digging in our gardens in the mud because it promotes soil compaction.

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Wave Hill chairs, Wave Hill Public Garden and Cultural Center

Plans for the famous Wave Hill garden chairs are available from http://www.danbenarcik.com/ for $25-$35. Even I could build one, just straight cuts and screws.

Bib-style garden aprons exist, made of canvas and with bigger pockets than kitchen aprons. Keep tools handy and shirt fronts clean!

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Insect house, Gardener’s Supply

Insect house, beehive house, insect hotel, insect habitat—these are all names for assemblages of hollow sticks you can buy. Insects beneficial to your garden can hide their eggs in them.

Anything with flowers on it will probably appeal to the gardener on your gift list—especially a plant.

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Shawnee Pottery teapot, circa 1940s, on Etsy.

Books

There is a cornucopia of beautiful garden books. If you buy a how-to book for you or someone here, just remember to ignore advice to add lime to soil since Cheyenne, unlike many parts of the country, already has alkaline soils. Check out the Timber Press imprint at https://www.workman.com/.

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Nature into Art: The Gardens at Wave Hill by Thomas Christopher, Timber Press

Classes/talks/workshops

The 6th annual Cheyenne Habitat Hero Workshop is all day Feb. 29 at Laramie County Community College. Denver Botanic Gardens’ international plant explorer Panayoti Kelaidis’s topic is “Rethinking Wyoming Landscaping: Learning from the Natives.” His talk is followed by “Native Plant Gardening 101” taught by the Cheyenne Habitat Hero Committee members. Registration is $25 (including lunch) at https://www.brownpapertickets.com/.

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Panayoti Kelaidis, keynote speaker, Habitat Hero workshop, Feb. 29, 2020

Register for Master Gardener training taught by Laramie County Extension horticulturist Catherine Wissner. It begins Jan. 6 for 10 weeks, two evenings a week. See https://lccc.coursestorm.com/ (search “Master Gardener”). It’s held at Laramie County Community College. You’ll also find two one-session LCCC non-credit gardening classes taught by Catherine listed at that same website.

The Seed Library will have several events at Laramie County Library. Check details at https://lclsonline.org/events:

–Jan. 25, 2-3:30 p.m., “Pumpkin Growing 101” featuring Andy Corbin, Wyoming’s most recent giant pumpkin growing champ.

–Feb. 27, evening, “Winter Sowing Workshop” and “Give-Take Seed Swap.”

If you are a green industry professional, employed in landscaping, lawn or tree care, attend the free Cheyenne Green Industry Workshop Jan. 24. Register through the City of Cheyenne’s Urban Forestry Division: http://www.cheyennetrees.com/events.

Several organizations schedule lecture series or occasional talks in the spring. Check for updates:

Cheyenne Botanic Gardens, https://www.botanic.org.

Laramie County Master Gardeners, http://www.lcmg.org/.

Laramie County Conservation District, https://www.lccdnet.org/.

Prairie Garden Club, https://www.prairiegardenclub.com/.

Garden tours

Last year I went on Road Scholar’s “Victoria and Vancouver: Glorious West Coast Gardens” (#2679) tour (I’ll be giving a public talk about it at Laramie County Master Gardeners’ meeting Jan. 16, 409 Pathfinder Bldg., LCCC, 7 p.m.). It runs several times every summer.

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Butchart Gardens, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, photo by Barb Gorges.

Another is “Topiaries, Pleasure Gardens and Botanical Gems in Philadelphia and Beyond” (#21967) which runs several times in spring and fall. You can look up the details at https://www.roadscholar.org/. Pop the course number in the search box.

You can also devise your own tour. Did you know that if you are a Cheyenne Botanic Gardens member, they have agreements with more than 300 U.S. gardens through the American Horticultural Society’s reciprocal admissions program, even though they don’t charge admission themselves?

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Cheyenne Botanic Gardens conservatory and gardens dedication ceremony, September 2019. The CBG is located at 710 S. Lions Park Drive. Photo by Barb Gorges.

That means CBG members visit free instead of paying $11 at the Gardens on Spring Creek in Ft. Collins which has recently added five acres of new gardens and a butterfly pavilion, or $12.50 at the Denver Botanic Gardens. I spend my savings at the gift shops!

Master Gardener wish list

“What’s on your wish list?” I asked several Master Gardeners recently:

“Narrow spade,” said Kathryn Lex.  It would be handy for inserting new plants in her established garden. She can read up on spades at https://www.gardentoolcompany.com/pages/garden-spades-choosing-the-right-one.

“More seeds,” said Michelle Bohanan. She’s on the Seed Library committee.

“No frost after Mother’s Day,” said John Heller. I think he needs a greenhouse.

“Tomatoes ripe by July 4th,” said Catherine Wissner. Wait, she has a high tunnel already. Maybe she wants a traditional glass greenhouse.

“No hail,” they all said. Make that a glass greenhouse with chicken wire over it for protection.

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Hartley Botanic greenhouse.


Local Author Day, Cheyenne

Saturday, September 14, 2019, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Laramie County Library

2200 Pioneer Ave., Cheyenne, Wyoming

I will be one of the authors from around the region selling and signing my two books:

Quilt Care Construction and Use Advice, How to Help Your Quilt Live to 100 and

Cheyenne Birds by the Month, 104 Species of Southeastern Wyoming’s Resident and Visiting Birds.

This year the library is partnering with Arts Cheyenne for the Cheyenne Arts Celebration “to celebrate a large and diverse collective of local artists.”

Make a day of it–get your lunch or snack at the Library Cafe! The entire event closes at 4 p.m.


Seed Library of Laramie County

2019-03 Seed Library Lar Co Barb GorgesSeed Library of Laramie County offers gardening classes

Published Mar. 24, 2019, in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle, “Sowing seeds of knowledge: Seed Library of Laramie County offers gardening classes.”

By Barb Gorges

            “If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.” Cicero

“Seed” + “Library”—one of the first times these words were put together in the modern era was in California in the early 2000s for the Bay Area Seed Interchange Library (BASIL). It is a place where people can swap seeds, as has been done historically, before the Burpee age.

A seed is rather like a book. You open it by adding water, soil and sunshine and soon you have the whole story. But for most of us, the concept of the library is the public library and one is expected to return the book. How do you return a seed? Save the seeds from what you grew and return them, if possible, though seed libraries won’t fine you if you don’t.

There is an art to saving seed. You need to know when to harvest it, sometime after it has reached maturity and before the pod shatters and scatters it. You also must be careful that wind or bees haven’t cross-pollinated your seed, making a hybrid.

Saving adaptations

One of the original goals of setting up a seed library was to protect the genetics of seeds that are not from commercial sources. The seeds that are handed down from generation to generation in one place become more and more adapted to those local growing conditions. Some of those may start out as commercially purchased seeds and little by little, become adapted (note: this works best with open-pollinated varieties, not hybrids).

Seeds become culturally important heirlooms, like varieties of beans grown in the Southwest.

Public library connection

There are several hundred seed libraries (http://seedlibraries.weebly.com) across the U.S. and in other countries, mostly located within public libraries. Many libraries find it difficult to get seed returned. Because so many of us have depended on commercial agriculture rather than our own gardens for food, the libraries have found we first need to re-learn how to grow vegetables—and flowers. Flowers are important for attracting insects to pollinate the vegetables.

Public libraries are all about spreading knowledge and so seed libraries have an educational component, like the classes offered by the Seed Library of Laramie County this spring.

The Seed Library of Laramie County got its start at the Laramie County Library in 2017. Librarian Elizabeth Thorsen recruited the Laramie County Master Gardeners and they looked at seed library models like the one in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, and Richmond Grows in Richmond, Virginia.

2019-03a Seed Library Lar Co Barb GorgesThe two local organizations have sponsored the cost, Master Gardeners’ part is from its annual plant sale. Costs include keeping up with the demand for seed, printing packets and educational materials, and purchasing what resembles a card catalog for organizing the seed packets. Donations of additional seeds and funds are appreciated.

Michelle Bohanan and Maggie McKenzie are two of the Master Gardeners working with library staff to put on this spring’s two free events:  Vegetable Gardens for Beginners Mar. 30 and the 2019 Seed Library Kickoff April 20.

Michelle, who has an extensive home seed library and takes part in the Seed Savers Exchange, https://www.seedsavers.org/, and other seed swaps, said one of the joys is watching children pick out their own seeds.

The seed library is located on the third floor and is open during library hours, Monday-Thursday, 10 a.m. – 9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.; and Sunday 1 – 5 p.m.  Ask the librarian at the Ask Here desk for help.

Seed Library of Laramie County classes:

Vegetable Gardens for Beginners
Saturday, March 30, 3 – 4:30 p.m., Storytime Room, Laramie County Library, 2200 Pioneer Ave. Free. Adults and teens.

Which plants should be started indoors? How much space does a cucumber need? What should be added to the soil? Get answers to these and other questions about vegetable gardens from local gardening experts.

2019 Seed Library Kickoff

Saturday, April 20. Laramie County Library, time and room to be determined. All ages. Free. Contact Kellie, kjohnson@lclsonline.org.

Get seeds for your garden and tips for simple, affordable gardening! We’ve chosen a huge variety of flowers, herbs, and vegetables suitable for beginning gardeners in our climate. Seeds and advice are free; no library card needed. Each person is limited to 12 packets of seeds.


Gardening education opportunities

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Several of the 100 participants in the 2015 Habitat Hero workshop fill out surveys while waiting for the next speaker to begin. Photo by Barb Gorges.

 

 

Also published at Wyoming Network News.

By Barb Gorges

Gardening classes, lectures and conferences are being offered in Cheyenne this winter and spring at Laramie County Community College, Laramie County Public Library and the Cheyenne Botanic Gardens.

LCCC Life Enrichment classes

Catherine Wissner, Laramie County Extension horticulturist, is offering four 2-hour classes on Saturdays, 10 a.m. – noon, $10 each. Sign up for one or more. To get details and register, call 307-778-1236 or go to the Life Enrichment website, lccc.wy.edu/workforce/LifeEnrichment.

Jan. 20 – Organic or All Natural: What Does that Mean? How growers become certified organic and how to be a more informed shopper.

Feb. 10 – Extending the Growing Season – Greenhouses, high tunnels and hoop houses and how to grow inside them.

Feb. 17 – Gardening for Butterflies, Bees and Birds – Design a garden that provides nectar and pollen, seasonal color and improves property value.

Feb. 24 – Garden Success in Laramie County – Learn how to grow vegetables, lawns and trees in our soils and growing conditions.

Laramie County Seed Library Winter Sowing – Jan. 20

Laramie County Library and the Laramie County Master Gardeners offer free seeds at the library for flowers and vegetables that grow well here, and free basic gardening classes.

Jan. 20 – Winter Sowing, 2-4 p.m., Storytime Room (2nd floor), Laramie County Library.

Some plants need cold temperatures, moisture, and natural sunlight cycles to germinate. Laramie County Master Gardener Michelle Bohanan demonstrates starting plants outside, but protected from weather and hungry birds. This method is especially useful for native perennials such as coreopsis, gaillardia, milkweed, and penstemon planted to attract bees, butterflies, and hummingbirds.

Contact: Maggie McKenzie, 307-632-8410.

High Plains Gardening Lecture Series

The Cheyenne Botanic Gardens and the Laramie County Master Gardeners present this lecture series again, but in a new location, the CBGs’ Grand Conservatory, 710 S. Lions Park Dr.

Lectures are at 1 p.m. and are $15 each or $40 for all three. Purchase tickets at the Tilted Tulip, CBG’s new gift shop, Wed.-Sun., 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., or call 307-637-6458.

Jan. 20 – Hummingbird Gardening from Agastache to Zauchneria, Shawn Huddleston.

Feb. 24 – Ruthless Gardening: Tough Love for Better Gardens, Shane Smith, CBG director.

March 24 – Crevice Gardens, Kenton Seth.

High Plains Organic Farming Conference – Feb. 27-28

The 5th annual conference will be held at Laramie County Community College. Registration is $50 and includes lunches. You can register for just one day. See www.highplainsorganic.org for a complete description. Contact Jay Norton jnorton4@uwyo.edu.

Habitat Hero – Bee Bird Friendly – Mar. 17

For the fourth year of Habitat Hero, the Cheyenne – High Plains Audubon Society is teaming with the Wyoming Bee College conference (See https://2018wybeeuniversitybeecollege.eventbrite.com or contact Catherine Wissner, cwissner@uwyo.edu) at Laramie County Community College.

Separate registration for the Mar. 17 Habitat Hero track includes the Wyoming Bee College keynote speaker at 8 a.m., Sarah Red-Laird, Bee Girl organization, and 6:45 p.m. speaker Dr. Raymond Cloyd, “Hollywood and Entomology: History of the 1950s Big Bug Science Fiction Movies.” The full day of Habitat Hero speakers include:

–Jane Dorn, growing native perennials for native bees,

–Barb Gorges, what birds need in your backyard and how to apply to be a Habitat Hero,

–Dena Egenhoff, the Cheyenne Board of Public Utilities’ Habitat Hero garden,

–Jessica Goldstrohm of The Bees Waggle, native bees,

–Wanda Manley, how to manage your piece of prairie.

Registration is $20 and includes snacks and lunch but not dinner. Register at https://www.brownpapertickets.com. Contact Mark Gorges, 307-287-4953, mgorges@juno.com, for more information.

Gardening for Success Conference 2018 – April 14-15

There will be 30 classes to pick from for gardeners of all levels of experience. The conference is put on by Laramie County Master Gardeners, University of Wyoming Extension’s Laramie County office and Laramie County Community College, where the conference will be held.

The $125 registration fee includes meals. See https://gardeningforsuccess2018.eventbrite.com for details and registration or contact Catherine Wissner cwissner@uwyo.edu.

Laramie County Master Gardeners Plant Sale – May 12

Now that the annual plant sale is indoors at the Laramie County Archer Complex, Archer Parkway east of Cheyenne, the plant sale has expanded to include a free series of short gardening lectures.