Cheyenne Garden Gossip

Gardening on the high plains of southeastern Wyoming

Know your Cheyenne trees

Tree Walk sign

Look for this sign by the Beach House at Lions Park. Below it is a map of Cheyenne’s Tree Walk. Photo by Barb Gorges

Published July 20, 2014, in the Wyoming Tribune Eagle, “Know your Cheyenne trees.”

By Barb Gorges

Summer is a good time to appreciate Cheyenne’s trees. Each one is a bit of a miracle since most trees are not native to the High Plains except for cottonwoods along creeks.

In addition to enjoying their shade, you may want to study our landscape trees if you are thinking about planting one yourself. For up-to-date planting considerations and methods, see my recent WTE column archived at www.CheyenneGardenGossip.wordpress.com.

One way to find trees that grow well here is to follow the Tree Walk in the southwest corner of Lions Park, set up by the Cheyenne Urban Forestry Division. There is a map on a sign next to the beach house. You can also pick up a booklet with a map and tree descriptions at the nearby Forestry office located at West 8th and Carey avenues.

A few not so hardy trees are missing. Plus, since the horrendous hail storms in June and July, some trees may be a bit ragged.

The Tree Walk features 31 trees marked with sign posts. I’ll highlight 12 here, many illustrated with photos of 50-year-old trees from my own neighborhood so you can see them in proportion to the houses.

As you travel around Cheyenne admiring our trees, see how many more species you can find. If you need identification help and the Forestry office is closed, try http://www.arborday.org/trees/whattree/fullonline.cfm.

Tree traits

For more information on each species, check the library, or online at a site like Wikipedia, or see the University of Wyoming Extension’s “Landscaping: Recommended Trees for Wyoming,” http://www.wyoextension.org/agpubs/pubs/B1090.pdf.

On the Cheyenne Botanic Gardens website, www.botanic.org, under “Gardening Tips,” you can find a list of water-wise trees and shrubs that thrive with less water—too much can actually kill them.

First, learn these codes

Here are codes for describing my top-12 trees everyone in Cheyenne should be able to identify.

E–Evergreen tree. All types provide winter protection for birds

F–Fall color, loses leaves

H–Hail hardy

N–Native to the West

W—Wildlife likes the fruits

WW–Water-wise

 

Ponderosa and Pinyon

1. Ponderosa Pine (L) and 2. Pinyon Pine (R) Photos by Barb Gorges

1. Ponderosa Pine

E, H, N, W, WW

Surrounding the Forestry office is a grove of extremely tall, skinny examples. However, in my neighborhood, single specimens look nice and full. I.D.: Look for bundles of two or three needles 5 inches or longer.

2. Pinyon Pine

E, H, N, W, WW

Iconic, drought-tolerant trees of the Southwest, they’re short, even after 50 years. If you are lucky, they could produce the prized pinyon pine nut. I.D.: needles 1.5 – 2.5 inches in bundles of two.

Bristlecone & Spruce

3. Bristlecone Pine (L) and 4. Colorado Spruce (R) Photos by Barb Gorges

 3. Bristlecone Pine

E, H, N, W, WW

They grow very slowly but live a long time—one in California is more than 5,000 years old. I.D.: drooping branches full of needles look like bottle brushes.

4. Colorado Spruce

E, H, N, W

Growing several stories high, spruces can grow too wide, forcing homeowners to prune away their skirts. There are new varieties that are narrower. I.D.: needles are single, short, stiff and very prickly.

 

Fir and Juniper

5. White Fir (L) and 6. Juniper (R) Photos by Barb Gorges

5. White Fir

E, H, N, W

It looks like, and grows as tall as a spruce, but it’s a soft version. Another soft-needled, spruce-like tree is the Douglas-fir. I.D.: flat, short, single, flexible, soft needles.

6. Juniper

E, H, N, W, WW

There are many varieties of upright junipers available through nurseries. They all produce little waxy bluish berries. Birds also appreciate their windproof foliage. I.D.: no needles—just green scales.

 

Cottonwood & Oak

7. Plains Cottonwood (L) and 8. Bur Oak (R) Photos by Barb Gorges

7. Plains Cottonwood

F, H, N

Wyoming’s state tree has tough, heart-shaped leaves. But cottonwoods require a lot of water, and after about 50-60 years, these huge trees start deteriorating, dropping limbs on hot summer days.

8. Bur Oak

F, W

We aren’t too far from this species’ native range. Slow growing, it may take a while to produce significant shade, but meanwhile, wildlife will enjoy the acorns. It was hard-hit by the hail, but will recover.

Mtn ash & Linden

9. European Mountain-ash (L) and 10. American Linden (R) Photos by Barb Gorges

9. European Mountain-Ash

F, H, W

Bunches of little white flowers in the spring will develop by midsummer into orange berries that are quickly devoured by birds. The small leaflets seem to avoid hail damage.

10. American Linden

F, W

The hail was hard on it, but this is a great shade tree. Plus it has fragrant flowers and produces bunches of little fruits. I.D.: leaves are heart-shaped, but not tough like cottonwood.

Honey Locust & Crab

11. Honey Locust (L) and 12. Flowering Crabapple (R) Photos by Barb Gorges

 11. Honey-locust

F, H, W

Look for the thornless type. Its small leaflets avoided some of the hail. May have 7-inch-long brown pods if it isn’t a fruitless variety.

12. Flowering Crabapple

F, W

These were hard to miss this spring, blooming profusely pink or white for weeks along Cheyenne streets and in parks and yards. They are popular with wildlife, which may eat the flowers as well as the fruit. I.D.: Oval leaves and small apples–always a few left on the ground.

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